Prince Andrew 'stonewalled' Virginia Roberts for 'five years': Accuser claims Duke's legal team were 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss sex abuse claims - as SECOND 'victim' could now sue

 Prince Andrew 'stonewalled' sex abuse accuser Virginia Roberts for 'five years', her legal team have claimed today - as it was revealed that the Duke of York could face a second lawsuit from another of Jeffrey Epstein's victim.

David Boies, who is representing Ms Roberts in her US civil case against the 61-year-old son of the Queen, said the Duke's legal team had been 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss the abuse claims made by his client.    

'We've reached out to Prince Andrew's legal team, a number of times over the last five years, we've made an attempt to engage with him to give him an opportunity to tell his side of the story, to provide any explanation or context, that he might have for his actions to try to resolve this without the necessity of litigation. Every such effort has been rebuffed,' he told Sky News today. 

He added: 'They have totally stonewalled us just like they've stonewalled the criminal prosecutors in the United States.'

It comes as it was today revealed that the Prince could face another US lawsuit from one of Jeffrey Epstein's victims who accused the royal of groping her breasts in a sickening attack involving a Spitting Image puppet of himself gifted to him by Ghislaine Maxwell.

Johanna Sjoberg has accused the Duke of York of sexually assaulting her when she was 21 years old and working as pedophile Epstein’s PA.

The incident is alleged to have taken place in front of Ms Roberts, now known as Virginia Giuffre, who has launched a bombshell legal action accusing Andrew of rape. 

The lawsuit - filed on Roberts' 38th birthday - claims that she was 'loaned' to the British royal and forced to have sex with Andrew three times on the orders of Epstein, fearing she would be killed if she disobeyed.

Ms Sjoberg, now 43, had previously been unable to sue because of the amount of time since the alleged attack. But a pending US law change could now allow her to bring her ­allegations to court.  

It came as Prince Andrew's working life was left hanging by a thread as he arrived in Balmoral with his ex-wife Sarah, Duchess of York, for a holiday with the Queen last night – just 24 hours after a bombshell US lawsuit accused him of sex abuse.  

Representatives for Prince Andrew, who vehemently denies any wrongdoing, last night offered 'no comment' to the sex abuse allegations.

Meanwhile his legal team, consisting of leading defence solicitor Gary Bloxsome, who has represented Premier League stars such as Jason Puncheon in the past, and leading QC Clare Montgomery, a extradition lawyer once used by Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, were said to be in discussions last night on how to respond.

Johanna is the second Epstein victim to claim that Andrew had attacked her while on his knee at the billionaire's New York home.

Ms Sjoberg has accused the duke of groping her by taking a Spitting Image puppet of himself and placing its hand on her breast after being jetted to the US by Epstein to 'entertain' the prince in around 2001. In another account she described Andrew touching her breasts while the puppet was used to grope Virginia Roberts.  

She said that she was recruited by Maxwell in 2001, when she was a student at Palm Beach Atlantic College.

Sjoberg was under the impression she was being hired as a personal assistant, but she soon realized her job was to provide 'sexual massages' to Epstein, who she has said told her that he needed to have 'three orgasms a day.'

She claims she was 'punished' when Epstein failed to orgasm as a result of one of her massages, which Maxwell allegedly told her were necessary because 'she [Maxwell] would not be able to please him as much as he needed and that is why there were other girls around'. 

David Boies, who is representing Ms Roberts (pictured) in her US civil case against the 61-year-old son of the Queen, said the Duke's legal team had been 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss the abuse claims made by his client

David Boies, who is representing Ms Roberts (pictured) in her US civil case against the 61-year-old son of the Queen, said the Duke's legal team had been 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss the abuse claims made by his client

Andrew, who was driving a Range Rover, held a stern expression while the Duchess of York appeared to be holding conversation while sat in the back seat

Andrew, who was driving a Range Rover, held a stern expression while the Duchess of York appeared to be holding conversation while sat in the back seat

Johanna Sjoberg pictured left in 2007
Johanna Sjoberg

Johanna Sjoberg (pictured left in 2007, and right today) says Prince Andrew groped her breast with a puppet at Jeffrey Epstein's New York home. She could soon be able to launch a US lawsuit against him

Johanna Sjoberg has accused the Duke of York of sexually assaulting her when she was 21 years old and working as paedophile Epstein’s PA.

Johanna Sjoberg has accused the Duke of York of sexually assaulting her when she was 21 years old and working as paedophile Epstein’s PA.

Andrew's arrival at Balmoral comes as the lawyer for Epstein victim Virginia Roberts accused the Prince of 'ignoring' him after a civil suit was filed against him . The Duke of York has always vehemently denied all charges made by Virginia Roberts

Andrew's arrival at Balmoral comes as the lawyer for Epstein victim Virginia Roberts accused the Prince of 'ignoring' him after a civil suit was filed against him . The Duke of York has always vehemently denied all charges made by Virginia Roberts

Prince Andrew's Spitting Image puppet
Prince Andrew's Spitting Image puppet, which Ms Sjoberg says was gifted to the royal by Ghislaine Maxwell

Prince Andrew's Spitting Image puppet, which Ms Sjoberg says was gifted to the royal by Ghislaine Maxwell (right with Jeffrey Epstein)


The beleaguered royal drove into the monarch's private Scottish estate for their annual August jaunt while his lawyers held crisis talks over the case launched by Virginia Roberts Giuffre.

She alleged she was sexually abused by Andrew when she was 17 and that he knew she was the teenage victim of sex trafficking. 

Miss Roberts claims she was forced to have sex with him and was 'lent out for sexual purposes' by paedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Yesterday a lawyer described the legal action as a 'grenade waiting to go off'.

Astonishingly Andrew, 61, has yet to make any public comment about the lawsuit and instead travelled to Scotland with his ex-wife.

His dog arrived at Balmoral in a separate car an hour earlier, suggesting the prince could be planning a lengthy stay. The Duke of York has previously denied claims he abused Miss Roberts and forced her into sex during a visit to London more than two decades ago.

The Queen's second son stepped back from royal duties over his relationship with late financier Epstein and insiders said the lawsuit effectively ended any ambition he held of a return to public life.

Andrew, who normally flies to Aberdeen by private jet for his visits to Balmoral, appeared to have taken steps to avoid photographers this time after apparently flying to a different airport, or even driving the whole way. 

Legal experts said the civil case could drag on for years and threatened to be a millstone around his – and the Royal Family's – neck for years to come.

A US lawyer warned the lawsuit would be devastating for the prince's reputation and could force him to answer questions about his own sexual history, as well as his relationship with Epstein. 

Miss Roberts' legal team could interrogate Andrew over whether he had faced any allegation of sexual misconduct or impropriety in the past, a US lawyer told the Daily Mail. 

Prince Andrew with Jeffrey Epstein on a stroll together after leaving Epstein's New York home in 2011

Prince Andrew with Jeffrey Epstein on a stroll together after leaving Epstein's New York home in 2011

Prince Andrew has been spotted arriving at Balmoral Castle accompanied by his ex-wife Sarah Ferguson - as he prepares to face the Queen a day after being sued in New York for allegedly sexually abusing Jeffrey Epstein victim Virginia Roberts

Prince Andrew has been spotted arriving at Balmoral Castle accompanied by his ex-wife Sarah Ferguson - as he prepares to face the Queen a day after being sued in New York for allegedly sexually abusing Jeffrey Epstein victim Virginia Roberts

The Duke today travelled to Scotland to join other members of the royal family for the tradition summer stay at Balmoral. The Queen, on her first trip to the castle after the death of her husband Prince Philip, arrived yesterday to a guard of honour in a small ceremony outside the castle gates

The Duke today travelled to Scotland to join other members of the royal family for the tradition summer stay at Balmoral. The Queen, on her first trip to the castle after the death of her husband Prince Philip, arrived yesterday to a guard of honour in a small ceremony outside the castle gates

Her Majesty The Queen, 95, arrived for her traditional summer holiday at Balmoral yesterday. She is seen here during an inspection of the Balaklava Company, 5 Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland at the gate

Her Majesty The Queen, 95, arrived for her traditional summer holiday at Balmoral yesterday. She is seen here during an inspection of the Balaklava Company, 5 Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland at the gate


They would also be entitled to demand access to any communications between him, Epstein and the convicted sex offender's alleged 'madam', socialite Ghislaine Maxwell.

The lawyer, who asked not to be named, said: 'It will be a train wreck for him. This case is a grenade waiting to go off.'

Andrew has 21 days to respond to Miss Roberts' claim and if he fails to do so, she could ask the court to find in her favour without the need for a trial, which would be potentially disastrous for his reputation.

It would raise the prospect of the ninth in line to the throne being branded a sex offender, and facing a demand for damages which could run into millions of pounds.

Such an outcome would cause enormous personal distress to the 95-year-old Queen but would also leave an indelible 'stain' on the reputation of the Royal Family, according to one royal expert.

Last night Buckingham Palace declined to comment and referred all inquiries to the Duke of York's legal team. 

In the legal claim, lawyers said Epstein, Maxwell and the prince had all forced Miss Roberts to have sex with Andrew against her will after she was trafficked to London.

They alleged Andrew also sexually abused the teenager at Epstein's mansion in New York and at his private island in the US Virgin Islands, Little Saint James.

The legal document, filed to a court in New York, said Miss Roberts, now 38 and a married mother-of-three known by her married name Virginia Giuffre, had suffered 'severe and lasting' damage. 

The lawsuit went on: 'In this country no person, whether president or prince, is above the law, and no person, no matter how powerless or vulnerable, can be deprived of the law's protection.

'Twenty years ago Prince Andrew's wealth, power, position, and connections enabled him to abuse a frightened, vulnerable child with no one there to protect her. 

'It is long past the time for him to be held to account.'

Miss Roberts' lawyer Mr Boies told Channel 4 News he had made repeated attempts to contact Andrew about the case, but claimed the prince and his lawyers had 'stonewalled' and ignored him. 

Mr Boies said: 'We've made every effort to reach out to him to hear his side of the story to understand whether he has anything that he can say that would put his actions in context. 

'And he has simply ignored us, and he can do that, but he can't ignore judicial process.

'This is now a matter for the courts to decide. And it would be very ill advised I think for anyone to sort of thumb their nose at a federal court. 

'If he did, obviously there would be a default judgment entered against him, which I think no one really wants to have happen.' 

He added: 'They just have totally stonewalled, they have refused to provide any explanation, they refuse to engage in any discussions, they refuse to provide any facts. 

'They've even refused to respond to any of the allegations that been made in any reasonable way.' 

Referring to the now-infamous photograph of the prince with his arm around Miss Roberts, he said a jury would have to consider if Andrew had been truthful about whether they had met. 

Her case is a civil lawsuit seeking unspecified damages – not a criminal case.

But experts warned evidence uncovered during civil proceedings could potentially be used by criminal authorities.

Andrew has always strongly denied any wrongdoing. 

A spokesperson for Prince Andrew told MailOnline this evening there would be 'no comment' on the civil suit.   

Virginia Roberts' lawyer David Boies today claimed Andrew and his lawyers had 'stonewalled' against the claims for five years but warned: 'He can ignore me and he can ignore Virginia, but he can't ignore judicial process'

Virginia Roberts' lawyer David Boies today claimed Andrew and his lawyers had 'stonewalled' against the claims for five years but warned: 'He can ignore me and he can ignore Virginia, but he can't ignore judicial process'

Prince Andrew is seen driving his car in Windsor earlier this year. He is yet to respond to her suit, filed in New York City on Monday

Prince Andrew is seen driving his car in Windsor earlier this year. He is yet to respond to her suit, filed in New York City on Monday

The Duke of York and the Queen attending St Mary the Virgin church in Hillington, Sandringham, Norfolk, last year

The Duke of York and the Queen attending St Mary the Virgin church in Hillington, Sandringham, Norfolk, last year


Prince Andrew arrived to Balmoral a day after Her Majesty, 95, who was welcomed back with a guard of honour in a small ceremony outside the castle gates - her first trip to Balmoral since the death of Prince Philip aged 99 in April. 

Andrew may have been comforted to have his ex-wife Fergie by his side for the trip, after she was invited to stay as long as her ex-husband did. It was previously reported the Duchess would have to leave before Prince Philip turned up.

However there may be awkward conversations for Andrew in his first meeting with his mother following the filing of the civil suit by Miss Roberts yesterday. 

The accuser, now 38, is seeking 'significant' damages from The Duke of York claiming she was sexually assault by him in New York, the Caribbean and London in 2001 - when she was 17 and he was 41. 

Prince Andrew is under no obligation to travel to America to defend himself against the allegations - which he has repeatedly denied - because courts can't extradite citizens in civil cases.

But legal experts say if he choses not to take part in the case, he could still face a trial in the civil courts in his absence. 

Before it reaches that stage, however, experts say that the Duke could instruct US lawyers to try and strike out Ms Roberts' law suit by claiming it to be 'spurious'.

If a judge throws out the case, then Prince Andrew will not need to attend anyway. But if a judge decides the case should be heard, then a civil jury is likely to be called, according to Aamer Anwar - a civil rights lawyer and activist from Scotland.

Mr Anwar says that if the Duke choses not to appear, the trial could go ahead in absentia - his absence. If the jury rules in Miss Roberts favour, Mr Anwar says Prince Andrew could be forced to pay damages 'into the millions and millions of dollars'.

After looking at any possible US assets, Mr Anwar says the courts could then apply to claim assets in Britain through the UK courts - in a way similar to how foreign assets are seized in high profile divorce cases.

He also believes that any judgment against Prince Andrew in the US could put pressure on UK authorities to take action - with one of the sex abuse claims made by Ms Roberts allegedly taking place in London.  

And, in a further blow to the Prince, royal experts today claimed the case could scupper any plans by the Duke to return to frontline royal duties.    

Prince Andrew is pictured with his mother, the Queen, his brother Prince Charles and, behind them, Princess Anne in June 2019. The Queen has diplomatic immunity; her children do not

Prince Andrew is pictured with his mother, the Queen, his brother Prince Charles and, behind them, Princess Anne in June 2019. The Queen has diplomatic immunity; her children do not


It comes as it was today revealed that Prince Andrew does not have diplomatic immunity - a privilege which is reserved for the Queen and her immediate household.

It means that the senior royal may be brought before a court if he sets foot in the US or any of its territories - at which point a court could compel him to give evidence.  

But legal experts say that will only happen if Prince Andrew willingly goes to the US. That is because Roberts' claim is a civil case, rather than a criminal one, meaning he cannot be extradited, according to experts.

Mr Anwar told MailOnline: 'The first thing is this is a civil case and under the terms of the extradition treaty, the U.S. Department of Justice can only extradite if there is a criminal prosecution.'

However, Mr Anwar added: 'It's not a matter that will simply go away. As I understand it, there is still an ongoing criminal investigation.'

'If they were to raise a prosecution, they would be well within their rights to seek Prince Andrew,' he said.

Mr Anwar also believes that, should the civil case proceed without Prince Andrew appearing in New York, the Duke could still be found liable in absentia and be required to pay compensation to Roberts.

He added: 'The court would find ways in which to obtain those assets.  And the complainant's country can pursue actions against Prince Andrew to chase his assets.'

Asked how much the damages cost could be, he said: 'It would be up to a jury, but I would think it could be in the millions and millions of dollars'.

However, before any of this, Mr Anwar said Prince Andrew's legal team will likely to try and have the case thrown out.

He said: 'I think the first thing he will do is instruct lawyers on the ground in the US to act for him, and to try and have the case thrown out as a 'spurious' case.'

The comments come as royal journalist and author, Robert Jobson today told MailOnline that the lawsuit would make any planned return to public life for the Duke 'impossible'.

He said: 'I cannot envisage the Duke, no matter how much he might want to returning to being a senior royal to supper the Queen while a suit is pending, or with the possibility of a verdict against him passed in his absence. 

'Obviously there is a question over legal jurisdictions and I am sure the Duke's team will be looking at every angle. I cannot see them volunteering him to give evidence, or going to the US as it will leave him exposed legally. 

'I suspect he will remain silent and continue to follow his lawyers advice. This of course was her only options and she only had until Saturday to lodge this civil case.'  

Prince Andrew is seen in Windsor on July 23 - what would have been his 35th wedding anniversary. He and Sarah Ferguson separated in 1992, and divorced in 1996

Prince Andrew is seen in Windsor on July 23 - what would have been his 35th wedding anniversary. He and Sarah Ferguson separated in 1992, and divorced in 1996 


Miss Robert's case is the first time that Prince Andrew has been the subject of a suit. Previously his name was mentioned in connection with pedophile Epstein, but until now he had not been directly targeted.  

In June 2020, the then-US Attorney General Bill Barr said that he was not seeking extradition as part of the investigation into Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell.

'I don't think it's a question of handing him over,' Barr said. 'I think it's just a question of having him provide some evidence'  

Meanwhile, royal commenter Richard Fitzwilliams told MailOnline that he sees 'no conceivable chance' of case leading to a court appearance for Prince Andrew.

He said: 'As I understand it the real reason for this court case is to do with issue of statute of limitation (the time in which a person must submit a civil claim).

'But I don't think that there's a conceivable chance (that he will appear in court), given the way things have been handled so far.

'Prince Andrew said in his BBC interview that he was willing to co-operate with the FBI (in their investigation into Epstein), but he doesn't appear, from reports, to have co-operated so far. So I see absolutely nil chance. 

'But this case will bring more embarrassment for him and for the royal family – as is anything to do with Andrew and Epstein,' Fitzwilliams added.

One thing Prince Andrew won't be able to do is rely on diplomatic immunity to protect him. That privilege in the case of royals is only for the Queen and members of her immediate household. 

Bob Morris, a constitutional law professor at UCL said in 2019: '[Sovereign immunity] is a concept devised to protect the position of heads of state, but heads of state only, not the members of their family in their function as head of state. And you can't have more than one head of the state.

'So it doesn't apply to the members of people's families, there is no logic in doing so. Andrew is in the same position as any other UK citizen.'

In 1978 Andrew's older brother Prince Charles was sued after a visit to Ohio the year before following a bizarre confrontation with a student. 

Before his address to the University of Cleveland, third-year law student Jack Kilroy, stood up and asked the Prince: 'I would like to know when England is going to stop torturing political prisoners?'

He was escorted out of the building, and then filed a civil complaint against Prince Charles for alleged deprivation of 'various rights guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States.'

The US Attorney General, upon the recommendation of the State Department, filed a suggestion of immunity with the court, on the view that the acts he allegedly committed were performed in his official capacity.

The court did not get as far as arguing whether Charles could be extradited for the civil case. 

Andrew's visit to the US to see Epstein was entirely in a personal capacity, and so he would not be granted the same leeway.

Andrew could certainly be charged  with an offence in the UK, if there were grounds to do so, although there is no indication of any such allegations being made there. 

His sister Princess Anne in 2002 became the first senior Royal to be convicted of a criminal offence after pleading guilty to a charge that one of her dogs attacked two children. 

The filing of a civil action against the Duke in America is certain to cause huge embarrassment for the Royal family. Virginia Roberts is pictured in Australia in February 2011

The filing of a civil action against the Duke in America is certain to cause huge embarrassment for the Royal family. Virginia Roberts is pictured in Australia in February 2011


The court also ordered her to keep the English bull terrier - known as Dotty - on a lead in public, to organise training for the animal and to pay £148 ($205) court costs.

She was fined £500 ($693) and ordered to pay £500 compensation.  No other senior royal has attended court for 100 years, the BBC said at the time. 

In late 2019, Andrew vowed to assist with any investigation. 'Of course, I am willing to help any appropriate law enforcement agency with their investigations, if required,' he said in a statement. 

At the time Buckingham Palace announced in a statement that Andrew would be suspended from public duties for the 'foreseeable future,' with the consent of the Queen. 

Soon after, he gave up his role as chancellor of the University of Huddersfield and stepped down from all of his 230 patronages. 

In January 2020, the Home Office recommended that the prince's security detail be downgraded. All activities carried out by the Prince Andrew Charitable Trust have also been stopped. 

He is now a permanently nonactive member of the royal family, with no public-facing duties required of him. 

Yet in January 2020 the United States attorney in Manhattan publicly called out the prince for breaking his commitment.

'To date, Prince Andrew has provided zero cooperation,' said the prosecutor, Geoffrey S. Berman.

Typically, if American prosecutors wanted to speak with a witness in Britain, the F.B.I. would go through its legal attach√© in London, based in the United States embassy there. 

Andrew is considered highly unlikely to risk traveling to the United States, even though he has not been charged with any crime.

He could be hauled before the FBI for questioning, and prosecutors could decide to request a subpoena from a judge if there is suspicion of criminal behaviour.  

He could 'take the 5th' and invoke his right against self-incrimination, and refuse to answer questions.

Daniel Sternberg, a barrister specialising in extradition law at Temple Garden Chambers in London, told the BBC: 'It is important to remember that Prince Andrew has not been charged with any offence in the US. 

'The FBI is investigating whether he has material evidence that could assist in its criminal investigation of alleged sex trafficking.

'While there is no way to compel Prince Andrew to give evidence in the UK or the US in either the civil or criminal case, his failure to do so does not sit well with his previous public statements that he would help any appropriate law enforcement agency with its inquiries.' 

Andrew's lawyers insist they have been open and willing to cooperate.

They have yet to comment on Monday's civil case. 

In her court filings on Monday, Miss Roberts accused the Duke of York of battery and intentional infliction of emotional distress in the lawsuit filed in federal court. 

It was filed under a law in New York that relates to child abuse as Miss Roberts was considered a minor at the time under state law.

It lists Miss Roberts as the plaintiff and the defendant as 'Prince Andrew, Duke of York a/k/a Andrew Albert Christian Edward' as the defendant. 

The lawsuit claims that 'Prince Andrew intentionally committed battery by sexually assaulting Plaintiff when she was a minor.

'On multiple occasions Prince Andrew intentionally touched (Roberts) in an offensive and sexual manner without her consent'.

Under the section of the lawsuit that deals with the formal allegation of intentional infliction of emotional distress, the lawsuit is withering about the Duke.

It says: 'Prince Andrew's actions, described above, constitute extreme and outrageous conduct that shocks the conscience.

'Prince Andrew's sexual abuse of a child who he knew was a sex-trafficking victim, and when he was approximately 40 years old, goes beyond all possible bounds of decency and is intolerable in a civilised community'.

The lawsuit claims that Andrew was one of the 'powerful men' who Epstein loaned Roberts out to for sex.

The document accuses the Duke of 'publicly feigning ignorance about the scope of Epstein's sex-trafficking operation and sympathy for Epstein's victims' then refusing to cooperate with the FBI.

The lawsuit notes that 'defendant Prince Andrew is a citizen of the United Kingdom, and is currently residing at the Royal Lodge at Windsor Great Park, Berkshire, United Kingdom, where he is domiciled'.

During each of the alleged incidents with Miss Roberts, Andrew was acting in a 'personal capacity' and not in any role for the Royal family or the UK government, the lawsuit notes.

Andrew has always strongly denied any wrongdoing and claimed he has never even met Roberts, now a mother-of-three living in Australia who goes by her married name, Virginia Giuffre.

In a statement to ABC News, Miss Roberts said: 'I am holding Prince Andrew accountable for what he did to me.

'The powerful and the rich are not exempt from being held responsible for their actions. I hope that other victims will see that it is possible not to live in silence and fear, but one can reclaim her life by speaking out and demanding justice.

'I did not come to this decision lightly. As a mother and a wife, my family comes first. I know that this action will subject me to further attacks by Prince Andrew and his surrogates. 

'But I knew that if I did not pursue this action, I would be letting them and victims everywhere down'.

Miss Roberts has made similar allegations before in US court documents but this is the first time she has sued the Duke directly.

She claims that the first time she was forced to have sex with Andrew was at the London townhouse of Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein's alleged madam.

The second time, in early 2001 was at Epstein's New York mansion, it is alleged. 

The lawsuit states: 'During this encounter, Maxwell forced Plaintiff, a child, and another victim to sit on Prince Andrew's lap as Prince Andrew touched her.

'During his visit to New York, Prince Andrew forced Plaintiff to engage in sex acts against her will'.

The third alleged incident is said to have taken place on Epstein's private island in the Caribbean.

During each incident, Miss Roberts claims she was was 'compelled by express or implied threats by Epstein, Maxwell and/or Prince Andrew to engage in sexual acts' with the Duke.

Miss Roberts 'feared death or physical injury to herself or another and other repercussions for disobeying Epstein, Maxwell, and Prince Andrew due to their powerful connections, wealth, and authority', it is claimed.

Andrew allegedly had sex with Roberts knowing she was a victims of sex trafficking, it is claimed.

The Duke also knew her age from 'communications with Epstein and Maxwell', she says.

The lawsuit claims: 'Prince Andrew sexually abused (Roberts) for the purpose of gratifying his sexual desires'.

The two formal allegations are battery and infliction of emotional distress.

Under the claim for battery, the lawsuit states Andrew's actions 'constitute sexual offenses as defined in (New York law) including but not limited to sexual misconduct as defined (as) rape in the third degree, rape in the first degree'.

It also claims the Duke's conduct amounted to 'forcible touching, sexual abuse in the third degree, and sexual abuse in the first degree'.

The 'sexual assault' Roberts caused her 'significant emotional and psychological distress and harm', it is claimed.

The lawsuit states: 'As a direct and proximate result of Prince Andrew's criminal acts, Plaintiff has in the past and will in the future continue to suffer substantial damages, including extreme emotional distress, humiliation, fear, psychological trauma, loss of dignity and self-esteem, and invasion of her privacy'.

The filing mentions that Andrew has failed to cooperate with the criminal investigation by the FBI into Epstein and Maxwell, despite promising to do so in his disastrous Newsnight interview.

The lawsuit states: 'In this country no person, whether President or Prince, is above the law, and no person, no matter how powerless or vulnerable, can be deprived of the law's protection.

'Twenty years ago Prince Andrew's wealth, power, position, and connections enabled him to abuse a frightened, vulnerable child with no one there to protect her.

'It is long past the time for him to be held to account.' 

The lawsuit was filed under the New York Child Victims Act, which was signed into law in 2019. Previously victims had up to five years after they turned 18 to file a claim

The one-off window gave all victims the opportunity to make a legal claim, regardless of how old their claim was. 

A defamation suit, filed by Roberts in 2015 against Ghislaine Maxwell, ended in a settlement – but deeply embarrassing depositions in which Maxwell discussed her sex life were made public last year.

A source said: 'This could be devastating for Andrew. If he chooses to fight it and is deposed [forced to give evidence], then those depositions could end up being made public.

'If he ignores it, he could be found guilty in absentia which would be a public relations disaster.'  

Epstein hanged himself in prison in 2019 while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges.

Maxwell, 59, was arrested last July and is due to go on trial in November for allegedly recruiting underage girls for Epstein. She has pleaded not guilty to all the charges.

It comes as Sarah Ferguson said she is convinced that her former husband Prince Andrew is telling the truth about his part in the scandal surrounding convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein.

The Duchess of York said she was '100 percent' certain that her ex-husband was being honest when he denied seeing anything untoward during the time he spent with the financier.

She told the Financial Times: 'I want him [Andrew] to come through this. I want him to win.'

When asked why she was sure of his probity, she replied: 'No question. I know everything about him. 

'I think he is an extraordinary person.' 

The Duchess said she and Andrew, who split in 1997, were 'the happiest divorced couple in the world', living under the same roof at Royal Lodge, Windsor, but with their own rooms.

'We support each other like pillars of strengths,' she added.

Prince Andrew 'stonewalled' Virginia Roberts for 'five years': Accuser claims Duke's legal team were 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss sex abuse claims - as SECOND 'victim' could now sue Prince Andrew 'stonewalled' Virginia Roberts for 'five years': Accuser claims Duke's legal team were 'totally uncooperative' in attempts to discuss sex abuse claims - as SECOND 'victim' could now sue Reviewed by Your Destination on August 11, 2021 Rating: 5

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